Cha Cha Cha!

Cha is mandarin chinese and means tea. Yesterday we two physiotherapists and one Finnish nurse (my roommate) went to Maokong hill. The trip there was simply amazing. First we took a gondola elevator which went quite fast. First it felt like being in a rollercoaster but after while I got used to it. The view was great. We could see part of the Taipei city and surrounding “hills” (Finn would call them mountains).

gondola

The view from the gondola. Maokong hill stop was about 300 m high.

After we got up there we were a bit hungry so we decided to find a teahouse, since the area is known for its tea. We picked one place at random because it seemed to have a nice terrace facing the cityview. It was just perfect! First we were a bit hesitating because we didn’t need to pay only for tea and snacks but also for the seats at the terrace. I glad we decided that it was worth it because it totally was. And in the end it was only about 370 NTD (about 9 €) per person.

parvekenäkymä

A set to prepare tea and some snacks at the terrace.

Our waitress showed us how to prepare tea properly and after that we just sat there for 3 hours drinking tea. We must have made at least 15 teapotfulls of that tea. We decided to stay to see sunset, because the view was just too great and we left after the citylights went on only to find out that there was a full moon at the other side of the gongola station. The expression on my travel companions face was great when he saw the moon: “wait a minute.. One shining ball just went down there, what is that?!?”

On our way down we admired the citylights on the other side and the fullmoon on the other riding the cabin in almost complete darkness just listening the silent hurring sound of the elevator and chirping (?) of the insects and birds from the forest we were crossing over. Just perfect I tell you!

How to prepare cha: (My tealoving friends, you must not judge me if I don’t remember everything correctly)

huuhtelu

Pour boilig water to the pot and over it to warm the pot.

kuppihuuht

Pour that same water to the teacups to warm them up.

kaato

Pour that water out using wooden pinching thingy so that you don’t burn your fingers.

teentäyttö

Add tealeaves to the pot filling it to 1/4 and add water. Leave it be for about 15-20 s.

kannuun kaato

Pour this first set of tea to another pot through a strainer.

1haudutus

Pour the tea to the cups and then pour it away since you don’t drink the first brewing.

kuppi

Fill the pot again and wait for 20 s. Pour the tea as explained before and then you have your first cup of tea you can actually drink according to all fine rules of tea brewing.

tyhjennys

You can use the same tealeaves for about 6-7 brewing. Then just take out used leaves and start from the beginning.

3 Comments

Anna
Posted 17.3.2014 at 9.59

Yep, that’s the way to do it! 🙂 Sounds like a perfect day you had up on the hill. I’m so happy that you could experience that. 🙂 Some day I’ll visit Taiwan and visit as many teahouses as I can!

BTW, the tea you have in the pictures looks like oolong. Am I right? Did you have some other type of tea, too?

Ida Liukkala
Posted 17.3.2014 at 15.36

Well our waitress said that it was a black tea. I don’t remember the name. I only remember that it was the local tea. We only had one kind of tea there because they gave us the whole package. 😀 They even said that if we don’t drink all we can take rest home..

hedda
Posted 24.3.2014 at 20.56

That sounds so amazing that i got travel fever. Thanks, I have no money -__-.
Pics are So beautiful I can’t even imagine how great it is in real life :’)